Micro-needling is a process carried out with a roller that is covered with numerous tiny needles. These needles penetrate the upper layers of skin to a depth of up to 2mm (depending on the needle length used). This process has two major benefits.

It effectively stimulates collagen formation at the same time as providing a clear channel for topical gels and creams to be absorbed more effectively through the top layer (epidermis) of the skin. Microneedling creates a very minor (almost microscopic) trauma that lasts for a short period of time and does not result in bruising or swelling or bleeding in the treated area in the way that chemical peels, laser therapy, or microdermabrasion do.

How does Collagen Induction Therapy work

The microscopic punctures (which are often just the opening of the pores of your skin) stimulate collagen production in the dermis layer as it breaks some of the blood vessels directly below the surface of the skin. As the blood clots, it creates the right environment for collagen and elastin formation. It is these key ingredients which help the skin to appear rejuvenated.

Although this sounds drastic, the process happens on a microscopic level and the outward appearance of any trauma is negligible. In fact, when done in the home with rollers of shorter needle lengths, you only get a reddening of the skin which lasts for a few hours. Clinical use of skin needling involves the use of numbing agents on the skin so that the treatment can be carried vigorously with minimal discomfort.